Research into Genetic Health of Irish Red Grouse Published

This research would not have been possible without the assistance of The Native Species Conservation Committee of Dublin & Belfast Zoos and Fota Wildlife Park, members of the Shooting and field trial communities for the provision of samples, University College Dublin and the University of Upsala, Finland.

The paper can be downloaded from here

Black Grouse numbers on the Rise

Surveys of traditional lek sites across black grouse strongholds in Scotland have revealed a dramatic rise in numbers of the rare bird.

The Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust (GWCT), which worked on the study with groups including RSPB Scotland and Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH), says that the results show that woodland initiatives and conservation efforts, boosted by a good breeding season in 2010, may be beginning to pay off.

GWCT Scotland director Dr Adam Smith said: “Well-focused advice, along with the support of farmers, gamekeepers and foresters, has surely helped the blackgrouse exploit to the full a couple of years of good weather in some of the more northerly parts of Scotland, with many parts of the Cairngorms showing strong populations.”

The new figures show that even the severely threatened populations in the South have bred well in the past 12 months. In Dumfries and Galloway, surveyors counted 194 males at 71 lek sites in 2011, a 31 per cent increase on 2010.

Figures collated by the Speyside Black Grouse Study Group, which includes 19 private sporting estates, were also positive, revealing the highest annual total of displaying black grouse since surveying began in 2001.

Trust Calls for Implementation of Grey Partridge Agri Environment scheme

The Irish Grey Partridge Conservation Trust, Birdwatch Ireland and the National Association Regional Game Councils have called on the Minister of Agriculture Simon Coveney TD to implement the Grey Partridge Agri environment scheme as soon as possible.

The Trust would like to recognise the continued support and funding of the Boora Project by the National Parks and Wildlife Service without whose support the project could not be as successfull as it has been to date.

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/breaking/2012/0228/breaking26.html

Trusts Work with Grouse Highlighted

The IGPCT is playing a leading role in developing an All Ireland Species action plan for Red Grouse.

This is happening in conjunction with partner organisations. BASC (NI) is one of these bodies.

The February 2012 edition of the Sporting Shooter magazine highlights the latest developments

Click on the link below to get to our downloads section:
Feb 2012 – Sporting Shooter pdf

Red Grouse Conference a great success

More than 150 delegates attended the Trust’s conference on Irish Red Grouse which was held in Tullamore on Saturday 16th. Delegates were drawn from a wide variety of fields.

The Trust were pleased to see the National Parks and Wildlife Service and BirdWatch Ireland were well represented at the conference. Speakers from UK, Sweden, Bahrain and Ireland presented their latest research findings on Irish Red Grouse to the delegates present.

 

Irish Red Grouse Conference – Time for Action

The Trust will host an important conference tomorrow Saturday 16th October in The Tullamore Court Hotel, Tullamore Co.Offaly to discuss the future for Ireland’s Red Grouse.

National and International speakers will address the conference to discuss the way forward for the conservation of native red grouse. The conference kicks off at 10:30am